ENES472 International Business Cultures | A. James Clark School of Engineering, University of Maryland

International Business Cultures (ENES472)

Global Leadership Courses

ENES472 - International Business Cultures (GenEd DVCC)

Available Summer I 2020 (online June 1, 2020 - July 10, 2020), Fall 2020 (online), Winter 2021 and Spring 2021! Summer session is open to all students. Register on Testudo now!

This course provides an intellectual and experiential forum for developing the interpersonal-intercultural communication and interaction skills necessary for international managers and travelers.

In a globalized world—characterized by the spread of products, technology, information, and jobs across national borders and cultures—the ability to work, manage and communicate in culturally diverse settings has become a key prerequisite for graduates.  ENES472 provides an overview of the role culture plays in international business and the unique issues that emerge due to cultural factors.  The course begins with an interrogation of one’s own cultural values, attitudes, and beliefs and then addresses those in other national and subnational cultures. Topics such as interpersonal communication, motivation, workplace conflict, team processes, business ethics, negotiation and decision-making are studied in the context of intercultural differences to highlight the complexities of a global workforce.  Case studies, media, role play and simulations will be used to explore and practice course concepts.  While students will primarily come from engineering and technology majors, the course content is relevant and applicable to anyone interested in developing cross-cultural competencies and cultivating a global mindset.

Course Learning Outcomes

The content and assignments from this course aim to help you: 

  1. Increase self-awareness through the exploration of values, beliefs, culture and identity. 
  2. Describe the concept of culture and explain how it influences attitudes, behaviors and practices at the individual, organizational, or societal levels.
  3. Compare and contrast two or more country cultures by examining business behaviors through cultural dimensions.
  4. Gain knowledge of theoretical frameworks of intercultural communication and its importance to global business and engineering.
  5. Develop skills to navigate and negotiate cross-cultural situations pertinent to business situations.

How can I apply this course to my degree program?

  • This course fulfills a GenEd Cultural Competence (DVCC) requirement.
  • Computer Engineering: Category F Elective
  • Electrical Engineering: General Technical Elective
  • Fire Protection Engineering: Technical Elective
  • Mechanical Engineering: Out-of-Major Technical Elective
  • Fulfills a minor requirement for sudents in the following minor programs:
    • International Engineering
    • Engineering Leadership Development
    • Global Engineering Leadership
    • Global Studies
  • Other majors/minors should reach out to their advisors to determine if this course can be applied to their degree program.

Meet Your Instructor

Natasha ChapmanDr. Natasha Chapman (she/her/hers)

Natasha Chapman is the Lecturer and Advisor for the Global Engineering Leadership Program and also serves as an affiliate Assistant Professor with the Department of Counseling, Higher Education, and Special Education. Previously, Dr. Chapman served as the Coordinator for the Leadership Studies Program at UMD, in which she was a co-investigator for a Global Classrooms Initiative Grant developing virtual courses, education abroad experiences, and an exchange program on global leadership with collegiate partners in Hong Kong.  As a leadership educator for 15 years, she also served as an Assistant Professor for Leadership Studies at WVU and as the Director of the TCU Leadership Center.  In these roles she has developed international partnerships, programs and experiences in 8 countries and 5 continents.  Dr. Chapman contributes regularly to the field of global leadership having presented at conferences in Brussels, Phnom Penh, and Montreal.  She has recently published on global classrooms in the Handbook of Teaching with Technology in Management, Leadership, and Business and on community impact of international projects in the Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning.

Minor students can register now in Testudo or contact the Office of Global Engineering Leadership to learn more!

If you are not currently enrolled in the Global Engineering Leadership Minor, you can request permission for this course by contacting Dr. Natasha Chapman (chapman3@umd.edu).


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