Find us On Facebook Twitter
News
news and events Events Energy Lectures Sustainability 2011 Sustainability 2010 Sustainability 2009 White Symposium Whiting Turner Lectures Current News News Archives Search News Press Coverage Press Releases Research Newsroom RSS feed Events Calendar events events
Make a Gift

News Story

Current Headlines

New NSF grant funds research to build network of tiny robots for bridge inspection

Beyond “Six Nines”: Ultra-enriched Silicon for Quantum Computing

UMD Celebrates Opening of UAS Test Site in Southern Maryland

University of Maryland Orbital Debris Education and Research Center to Host Inaugural Workshop

DOE Invests in UMERC Battery Research

Fighting Fungus: Engineering Antibodies for Validating Antifungal Drug Targets

Weiner Wins Sikorsky Aircraft Fellowship

Students Use UMD Supercomputer to Design, Test Materials

Hydrophobically Modified Polymers Create “Cell Gels”

UMERC's Advanced Energy Storage Technology Selected by NASA

News Resources

Return to Newsroom

Search Clark School News

Research Newsroom

Press Releases

Archived News

Magazines and Publications

Press Coverage

Clark School RSS Feed

Events Resources

Clark School Events

Events Calendar

Bookmark and Share

New Detection for Concealed Radioactive Materials

Professor Victor Granatstein (ECE/IREAP) and Research Scientist Gregory S. Nusinovich (IREAP) have proposed a scheme for detecting concealed radioactive materials without searching shipping containers one by one.

The concept, described in a recent article co-authored by Granatstein and Nusinovich in the Journal of Applied Physics, is based on the gamma-ray emission from the radioactive material that would pass through the shipping container walls and ionize the surrounding air. The breakdown of the air in a focused beam of high-power radiation would indicate the presence of the radioactive material. The gamma rays coming through the container walls could be detected by a pulsed electromagnetic source.

Detection of radioactive material concealed in shipping containers is important in the early prevention of "dirty" bomb construction.

The team evaluated several candidate sources for this detection.

"It is not yet clear whether this approach to detection of nuclear material is practical," said Prof. Granatstein, "but it is worth pursuing, since it might impact an important need related to national security."

The article describing the research, titled "Detecting Excess Ionizing Radiation by Electromagnetic Breakdown of Air," by Victor L. Granatstein and Gregory S. Nusinovich, appears in the Journal of Applied Physics, and can be accessed at http://link.aip.org/link/japiau/v108/i6/p063304/s1.

Related Articles:
High-Tech Solution to "Dirty Bomb" Threat

November 9, 2010


Prev   Next