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"Converting Invention into Innovation – Experiences, Opportunities and Open Challenges"

A Whiting-Turner Lecture: March 8, 2012

Amy Alving

Amy Alving, CTO of SAIC, gave a Whiting-Turner Lecture on March 8.

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Biography

Amy Alving, Ph.D., is the chief technology officer and senior vice president at Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). She leads SAIC's Office of Technology, which is responsible for the creation, communication and implementation of SAIC's technical and scientific vision and strategy.

Alving joined SAIC in 2005 as the chief technology officer for the Engineering, Training and Logistics Group, and later served as the corporate chief scientist. She has a diverse background in government and academia, with over 15 years of accomplishments in the areas of technology and national security. Prior to joining SAIC Alving served as the director of the Special Projects Office at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, where she was a member of the Senior Executive Service. In this role she was responsible for strategic planning, operations, finances, security, program development and execution.

Alving was a White House Fellow (1997-98) serving at the Department of Commerce. Prior to that, she was an associate professor of aerospace engineering at the University of Minnesota, where she taught graduate and undergraduate students in mechanics, fluids, and experimental methods, served as a thesis advisor to graduate students and conducted independent, basic research.

Alving graduated from Stanford University with a B.S. in mechanical engineering and from Princeton University with a Ph.D. in mechanical and aerospace engineering. She carried out post-doctoral research in Berlin, Germany.

Alving serves on the Board of Directors for Pall Corporation. She is also a member of the Georgia Institute of Technology Advisory Board and has been a member or advisor to the Naval Research Advisory Committee, Army Science Board, Defense Science Board, and National Academies studies. She has been on the Board of Directors of the Fannie and John Hertz Foundation, and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Abstract

Technologists make the world a better, safer place through the invention-to-innovation lifecycle. Drawing on her wide-ranging experience across academia, government and industry, Dr. Amy Alving will discuss the different skillsets the lifecycle requires and the opportunities it offers for achievement: from exploring the frontiers of knowledge through university research; to creating a vision for addressing pressing problems in national security; to developing innovative solutions that are both practical and affordable. She will conclude by discussing several of the most important unsolved challenges we face in the Information Age.